Mass Tort Litigation

Mass Torts Take Years To Settle. Need Cash Now?

TriMark Legal Funding provides mass tort and toxic tort litigation funding for plaintiffs and attorneys.

Legal Funding on Mass Torts

TriMark is one of America’s foremost litigation funding companies. We provide lawsuit cash advances to plaintiffs and mass tort financing to law firms.


Two types of people visit this page.

The first kind is plaintiffs in toxic torts, mass torts, or multidistrict litigation who are interested in getting a cash advance against their future potential settlement proceeds before their case has settled.

If that’s you, read on. You’re in the right place.

The second kind is mass tort law firms and toxic tort law firms who are interested in financing and working capital solutions for the firms.

If that’s you, you’ll want to visit our litigation funding page.

At TriMark Legal Funding, we offer non-recourse lawsuit funding cash advances to plaintiffs who are involved in either pending or settled legal claims, often in 24 hours or less.

Lawsuit loans are a discreet, sensible way to keep your head above water until your attorney has finished negotiating your lawsuit settlement.

At TriMark Legal Funding, we offer non-recourse lawsuit funding cash advances to plaintiffs who are involved in either pending or settled legal claims, often in 24 hours or less.

Lawsuit loans are a discreet, sensible way to keep your head above water until your attorney has finished negotiating your lawsuit settlement.

Take 30 Seconds and Get a Lawsuit Cash Advance Now

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    Lawsuit Funding 101: The how's, why's, and what for's of legal funding.

    What Is Lawsuit Funding?

    Lawsuit funding is referred to by many names such as lawsuit loans, pre-settlement loans, and post-settlement loans.

    Despite what many people call it, however, it’s not a loan.

    Legal funding is a non-recourse cash advance of a portion of the anticipated future value of a plaintiff’s lawsuit settlement.

    Lawsuit funding is referred to by many names such as lawsuit loans, pre-settlement loans, and post-settlement loans.

    Despite what many people call it, however, it’s not a loan.

    Legal funding is a non-recourse cash advance of a portion of the anticipated future value of a plaintiff’s lawsuit settlement.

    Have Questions?
    Call and speak with one of our funding experts today.

    How Lawsuit Loans Work

    TriMark Legal Funding specializes in helping personal injury accident victims.
    Our non-recourse legal funding is a simple 3-step process:

    1. Apply for Funding

    You can either apply online or call us toll-free at (877) 932-2628. We’ll answer all of your questions and gather some basic facts about your case.

    2. Review & Approval

    Our team will work directly with your attorney to review your case. Approvals can happen as quickly as 1 hour after receipt of all required information.

    3. Receive Cash

    A funding agreement is sent via DocuSign. After signed copies are returned, your cash is sent to you by wire transfer or FedEx Overnight.


    Apply For Lawsuit Funding Now

    Are you ready to move your life in a more positive direction?

    TriMark Legal Funding is excited to help you through this difficult time. We’ve helped thousands of people in similar circumstances, and we appreciate the opportunity to help you too.

    Lawsuit Funding FAQ Apply Now

    It’s free to apply, and it only takes a minute. Best of all, you could receive the money you need as quickly as tomorrow. You can apply online or call (877) 932-2628, and one of our friendly representatives will be happy to take your application right over the phone.

    Lawsuit funding from TriMark is just pure financial help, right when you need it most. And approvals can happen so fast that if you apply today, you could receive cash tomorrow.

    When you choose TriMark Legal Funding, you’re in excellent hands, and we’ve always got your back.


    Latest Developments in Mass Tort & Toxic Tort Litigation…

    What is Zantac? Zantac is a popular OTC (over-the-counter) drug that is taken to relieve and prevent heartburn. It is also used to treat indigestion, acid reflux, and a variety of other health issues associated with GERD (gastroesophageal reflux disease), and it can be prescribed by a physician to treat any of these disorders. In early 2020, the FDA issued a recall on Zantac due to the fact that its active ingredient ranitidine may be linked to the development of certain cancers, including stomach, colon, and bladder cancers. Ranitidine Explained Prior to April 2020, the main ingredient in Zantac (and some other antacids) was ranitidine, which is an H2 blocker (histamine-2 antagonist). The purpose of H2 blockers in antacids is to prevent certain cells in … Read more
    As the number of children diagnosed with autism hits staggering highs, a groundbreaking lawsuit seeks to hold some of America's most trusted baby food companies at least partially responsible. The first of its kind lawsuit is on the cusp of a monumental step forward. This month, a judge heard early arguments about the presence of toxic heavy metals in baby food, and how they may harm a child's developing brain. It's an issue Spotlight on America has been investigating for years. If the judge rules that the science is valid, major brands like Gerber and Beech-Nut could soon be in the hot seat in a court of law and millions of families could have potential recourse. Spotlight on America was first to speak with the California mom who is taking on an army of industry giants on behalf of her son, claiming his autism diagnosis can be traced back to heavy metals in… Read more
    Philips Respironics manufactures “continuous positive airway pressure” (CPAP), bilevel positive airway pressure (BiPAP), and ventilators for the treatment of obstructive sleep apnea. Those with this condition experience disruption of normal breathing during sleep, as manifested by snoring. These machines use polyester-based polyurethane foam to diminish the noise and vibrations generated while the user sleeps. When the foam degrades, it releases toxic gases and matter, which the users may inhale and ingest. As explained more below, the toxins may sicken users and expose them to serious conditions such as organ failure and cancer. Philips issued a recall on June 14, 2021, for the first-generation devices. In the wake of this recall, numerous users have sued Philips for personal injuries and other damages. Below, we explain whether you can sue Philips if you claim one of its devices has resulted in illness or serious disease. Did You Use One of the Recalled… Read more
    E-cigarette giant Juul Labs will pay Arizona $14.5 million and vowed not to market to young people in the state to settle a consumer fraud lawsuit. The settlement announced by Attorney General Mark Brnovich Tuesday is the second Juul has reached with state prosecutors. It ends litigation the Republican U.S. Senate candidate filed in January 2020 against Juul and another maker of electronic cigarettes, alleging they illegally targeted young people in their marketing. Arizona previously obtained a $22.5 million judgment against defunct vaping product maker Eonsmoke but has not and is not likely to collect any of the money. Juul Labs admitted no wrongdoing in settling the case and called it “another step in our ongoing effort to reset our company.” The company had stopped all advertising before Brnovich sued and ended sales of all flavored products except menthol. Juul has faced lawsuits from multiple states over marketing of its… Read more
    A division of Swiss pharmaceutical maker Novartis is halting distribution of generic Zantac pills over concerns about an ingredient possibly linked to cancer. Novartis-owned Sandoz has issued a "precautionary distribution stop" of all medicines containing ranitidine, an antacid and antihistamine used to block stomach acid. The stop "in all our markets will remain in place" until "further clarification," Novartis said. "Our internal investigation is ongoing to determine further details," the company said. The move came after the Food and Drug Administration last week said it had detected low levels of a probable carcinogen in the heartburn drug Zantac and its generic versions. Test findings:FDA finds probable carcinogen in Zantac and other heartburn drugs The probable carcinogen, called NDMA, has also prompted the recall of several … Read more
    A substance that could cause cancer has been found in some ranitidine heartburn and ulcer medicines, including the brand-name drug Zantac, and the source of this contamination is being investigated, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration says. While preliminary tests found low levels of the nitrosamine impurity N-nitrosodimethylamine (NDMA) in some ranitidine products, the FDA said this does not mean patients taking the drugs should stop using them now. NDMA is the same contaminant found in many brands of blood pressure and heart failure medicines during the past year, leading to recalls. Patients who are taking prescription ranitidine and want to stop using it should discuss alternatives with their health care provider, the FDA advised. Those taking over-the-counter (OTC) ranitidine could switch to other OTC … Read more
    The biggest tobacco companies in the United States will start running prime-time television commercials and full-page ads in national newspapers on Sunday — but the campaign is unlikely to spur enthusiasm for their products. “More people,” one ad says, “die every year from smoking than murder, AIDS, suicide, drugs, car crashes, and alcohol, combined.” Another reads: “Cigarette companies intentionally designed cigarettes with enough nicotine to create and sustain addiction.” Each ad starts by noting that Altria, R. J. Reynolds Tobacco, Lorillard and Philip Morris USA were ordered to make the statements by a federal court. The messages stem from a lawsuit brought by the Justice Department in 1999. As part of the 2006 ruling in the suit, which sought to punish cigarette makers for decades of deceiving the public about the dangers of their product, the companies were ordered to disseminate “corrective statements” centered on the health risks and addictive nature of… Read more
    What do you get when you blow hot air around a surgical patient? If you’re 3M Co., the maker of the Bair Hugger Forced Air Warming Device, you get over 2,600 lawsuits. You also get a letter from the FDA telling healthcare providers that the device is actually cleared for use. The Bair Hugger was designed to “promote post-surgical healing and cut down on infections by maintaining a patient’s body temperature in surgery.” The device is basically a heater and a plastic “blanket.” The “blanket” is draped over the patient, and the heater draws in room air from the OR, heats it, and blows it into the “blanket.” The Bair Hugger is designed to counteract patients’ inability to regulate body temperature while under general anesthesia. According to Dr. Joe Jackson at Anesthesia Myths, “Your body is a finely tuned machine that normally regulates its temperature within several tenths of a… Read more
    The Bair Hugger Normothermia System is a forced-air warming, or FAW, system designed to prevent hypothermia and keep patients at a normal core body temperature during all three phases of orthopedic surgery — preoperative, intraoperative and postoperative. Hospitals have used Bair Hugger devices on more than 200 million patients since 1987 and continue to do so today. More than 50,000 units are installed in the 80 percent of hospitals in the U.S. that use FAW therapy. The warming blankets stabilize core temperature ahead of surgery, then maintain it during the procedure and immediately afterward as the patient recovers. The current Bair Hugger warming units include models 505, 750 and 775. Model 500 is no longer in production. 3M, the company that manufactures the devices, also makes disposable Bair Hugger blankets and gowns. How Bair Hugger Therapy Works Bair Hugger warming units filter air and then force warm air through Bair… Read more
    According to InsideClimate News, the office of New York State Attorney General Eric Schneiderman had been investigating ExxonMobil for a year before it issued a recent subpoena for “documents on what Exxon knew about climate change and what it told shareholders and the public.” The subpoena compelled ExxonMobil to hand over scientific research and communications about climate change dating back to 1977. (Exxon and Mobil merged to become a single corporation in 1999.) The investigation is based on New York State’s consumer-protection and general-business laws and, crucially, the state’s Martin Act, InsideClimate News reported. That statute prohibits fraud or misrepresentation in the sale of securities and commodities, and gives the Attorney General extraordinary power to fight financial fraud. Exxon had no duty to share with the public the information it gathered about climate change starting almost forty years ago, but it was forbidden to deceive shareholders and potential buyers of its… Read more
    The inventor of Bair Hugger warming blankets, also called forced air warming blankets (FAW), is warning of the risk for infections the device could cause when used during orthopedic surgeries. Dr. Scott D. Augustine invented the Bair Hugger warming blanket and introduced it in 1988. The blankets were a success, but now he is claiming the blankets have an increased risk of spreading infection during surgery. “I am very proud of the old technology,” Augustine told the New York Times. “But I am also proud to spread the word that there is a problem.” Doctors use the warming blankets in millions of surgeries every year to prevent hypothermia – a condition where the body loses heat quicker than it can produce it. Augustine marketed warming blankets through his company Augustine Medical which later changed its name to Arizant. Augustine resigned from his positions as chairman of the board and chief… Read more
    Despite scientific evidence to the contrary, a small group of otolaryngologists have repeatedly testified, on behalf of the tobacco industry, that heavy smoking did not cause the cancer in cases of dying patients suing for damages, according to a study by a Stanford University School of Medicine researcher. “I was shocked by the degree to which these physicians were willing to testify, in my opinion in an unscientific way, to deny a dying plaintiff — suffering the aftermath of a lifetime of smoking — a fair trial,” said Robert Jackler, MD, professor and chair of otolaryngology-head and neck surgery, referring to the physicians cited in the study as a “pool of experts willing to say over and over again that smoking didn’t cause cancer.” The study was created by a Stanford University School of Medicine researcher and published online July 17 in Laryngoscope. Jackler, who holds the Edward C. and Amy H. Sewall… Read more
    Three major U.S. tobacco companies including R.J. Reynolds Tobacco, Lorillard, and Altria’s Philip Morris USA will pay $100 million to settle hundreds of federal lawsuits over smoking, according to an announcement from plaintiffs’ lawyers on Wednesday. The agreement will cover more than 400 lawsuits filed in federal court in Florida by smokers or their families, according to the announcement. The settlement will not cover cases that have gone to trial or already reached a verdict. Philip Morris and R.J. Reynolds will each pay $42.5 million, and Lorillard will pay $15 million, according to a lead lawyer for plaintiffs, Joe Rice of law firm Motley Rice. It is the first major agreement reached by the three companies to resolve a chunk of so-called Engle cases, named after a former class action brought by Florida residents over injuries or deaths they said were caused by tobacco-related medical conditions. In 2006, the Florida… Read more
    “Are you awake now? Do you hear what the jury is saying? You have to stop,” Cynthia Robinson wants to tell the tobacco industry. The Florida widow recently won a $23.6 billion lawsuit against tobacco company R.J. Reynolds, one of the largest recent judgments on the industry, and in an interview with TIME, she says she hopes they listen to the jury’s message. Robinson’s husband Michael Johnson died in 1996 at age of 36 from lung cancer, and in her lawsuit against R.J. Reynolds, she and her attorneys argued that the company was aware that cigarettes were addictive and caused lung cancer, but was negligent in telling smokers like Johnson about those risks. Johnson got hooked on cigarettes when he was just 13-years-old, and eventually smoked up to three packs a day, often lighting his next cigarette with the burning end of the one he just finished. “He was a… Read more
    A Florida jury awarded a widow $23.6 billion in punitive damages in her lawsuit against tobacco giant R.J. Reynolds Tobacco Company, her lawyer said. Cynthia Robinson claimed that smoking killed her husband, Michael Johnson, in 1996. She argued R.J. Reynolds was negligent in not informing him that nicotine is addictive and smoking can cause lung cancer. Johnson started smoking when he was 13 and died of lung cancer when he was 36. The jury award Friday evening is “courageous,” said Robinson’s lawyer, Christopher Chestnut. “If anyone saw the documents that this jury saw, I believe that person would have awarded a similar or greater verdict amount,” he said. The Escambia County trial took four weeks and the jury deliberated for 15 hours, according to the Pensacola News Journal. The verdict included more than $16 million in compensatory damages, the newspaper said. Nine ex-smokers on their last cigarette Chestnut said five… Read more
    It’s hard to think of anything more reckless than adding a deadly carcinogen to a product that already causes cancer—and then bragging about the health benefits. Yet that’s precisely what Lorillard Tobacco did 60 years ago when it introduced Kent cigarettes, whose patented ‘Micronite” filter contained a particularly virulent form of asbestos. Smokers puffed their way through 13 billion Kents between March 1952 and May 1956, when Lorillard changed the filter design. Six decades later, the legal fallout continues—just last month, a Florida jury awarded more than $3.5 million in damages to a former Kent smoker stricken with mesothelioma, an extremely rare and deadly asbestos-related cancer that typically shows up decades after the initial exposures. Lorillard and Hollingsworth & Vose, the company that supplied the asbestos filter material, face numerous claims from mesothelioma sufferers, both factory workers who produced the cigarettes or filter material and former smokers who say they… Read more
    Fifteen years after tobacco companies agreed to pay billions of dollars in fines in what is still the largest civil litigation settlement in U.S. history, it's unclear how state governments are using much of that money. So far tobacco companies have paid more than $100 billion to state governments as part of the 25-year, $246 billion settlement. Among many state governments receiving money, Orange County, Calif., is an outlier. Voters mandated that 80 percent of money from tobacco companies be spent on smoking-related programs, like a cessation class taught in the basement of Anaheim Regional Medical Center. "So go ahead and take a minute or two to write down reasons why you want to quit and we'll talk about them in just a bit," Luisa Santa says at the start of a recent session. Every year since 1998, this program has been funded by money from the tobacco settlement. The… Read more
    Don Barrett, a Mississippi lawyer, took in hundreds of millions of dollars a decade ago after suing Big Tobacco and winning record settlements from R. J. Reynolds, Philip Morris and other cigarette makers. So did Walter Umphrey, Dewitt M. Lovelace and Stuart and Carol Nelkin. Ever since, the lawyers have been searching for big paydays in business, scoring more modest wins against car companies, drug makers, defective medical devices, brokerage firms and insurers. Now, they have found the next target: food manufacturers. More than a dozen lawyers who took on the tobacco companies have filed 25 cases against industry players like ConAgra Foods, PepsiCo, Heinz, General Mills and Chobani that stock pantry shelves and refrigerators across America. The suits, filed over the last four months, assert that food makers are misleading consumers and violating federal regulations by wrongly labeling products and ingredients. While there has been a barrage of litigation… Read more
    Has big tobacco been holding out on its customers? New research suggests that tobacco companies have known for 40 years that cigarette smoke contains cancer-causing particles, but deliberately hid the information from the public. Check this out: 47 vintage smoking ads when doctors plugged tobacco For the study – published in the September 27 issue of Nicotine & Tobacco Research – UCLA researchers examined dozens of internal tobacco industry documents made public after a 1998 court case, and found tobacco companies had known cigarette smoke contained potentially dangerous radioactive particles as early as 1959. "They knew that the cigarette smoke was radioactive way back then and that it could potentially result in cancer, and they deliberately kept that information under wraps," study author Dr. Hrayr S. Karagueuzian, professor of cardiology at UCLA's cardiovascular research laboratory, said in a written statement. "We show here that the industry used misleading statements to… Read more
    Lawsuits seeking compensation from cigarette makers for cancers and other illnesses are on the wane in much of the country, but in one state, Florida, tobacco litigation has never been hotter. Juries have increasingly become skeptical of suits blaming smoking injuries on tobacco companies. However, plaintiffs in Florida, aided by a 2006 state Supreme Court ruling that told jurors in future cases to accept that cigarette makers had misled smokers about the dangers, have won hundreds of millions of dollars in verdict awards…. Read more
    "Doubt is our product," stated a tobacco industry memo from 1969. For half a century, the tobacco industry tried to muddy the link between smoking and cancer. Now, with that effort long since failed, cigarette producers facing dozens of potentially ruinous lawsuits are once again attempting to manufacture doubt. "The tobacco industry is now trying to win their cases by rewriting history, saying that everyone knew but no one had proof," said history Professor Robert N. Proctor. "What they're saying is that everyone always knew it was bad for you. So if you started smoking in 1962 or 1972 and later got lung cancer, you have only yourself to blame." Proctor spoke Feb. 18 during a symposium—"The Sociopolitical Manufacturing of Scientific Ignorance"—at the annual meeting of the American Association for the Advancement of Science in San Francisco. Proctor claims that by the middle of the 1950s there was a scientific… Read more

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    Legal funding is not a loan. It is the non-recourse purchase of an equitable lien in a plaintiffs’ legal claim. Words such as ‘loans,’ ‘lending,’ ‘borrow,’ etc., are used for search and marketing purposes only.
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    TriMark Legal Funding LLC
    1056 Green Acres Rd #102
    Eugene, OR 97408