Opioid Settlement Loans

Following The Opioid Lawsuits and Opioid Settlement Proceedings

TriMark Legal Funding is tracking the latest developments in the opioid litigation

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How Did We Get Here?

A lot has been written about Purdue Pharma, the Sackler family, Oxycontin, and the progression of the opioid epidemic over the last two decades.

Not least among them is an insightful 3-part series by Drugwatch about Big Pharma’s ‘prescription addiction‘. Also noteworthy is this guide to opioid litigation.

The crisis is by no means in the rear-view mirror yet, and yet it has become clear how it started, the conditions that facilitated it, and how and why it was allowed to go on for so long.

Like all record-breaking pharmaceutical catastrophes in the last 75+ years, the opioid epidemic was the entirely predictable result of unbridled greed.

It was conceived in the minds of criminals who had no compunction whatsoever about trading the lives and misery of, literally, tens of millions of people in exchange for tens of billions of dollars in profits.

It was allowed to persist because of manipulation and gross failures within the Food and Drug Administration (FDA).

It was fueled by a “trough mentality”; unconscionable levels of greed and apathy that started with Purdue Pharma, Oxycontin’s manufacturer, and was turbocharged by McKinsey & Company, the world’s most prestigious management-consulting firm.

Huge pharmaceutical companies like Johnson & Johnson, distributors, and big pharmacy chains like Walgreens, CVS, Walmart and Rite-Aid fed the epidemic by willfully ignoring obvious warning signs.

Where Is It All Heading?

After creating enough death and destruction, big pharmaceuticals always get caught.

When they do, they go through the motions of making amends, throw as little money at the problem as possible, and discuss takeaways for how to prevent the next disaster.

Cost estimates for remediating the opioid epidemic are currently around $483 billion.

Indiana filed suit and so did other states. McKinsey, the consulting firm that guided Purdue’s marketing efforts, bought themselves a $600 million lifeboat when they settled with 47 state’s Attorney’s General.

The Sackler’s despised the idea of thousands of individual settlements and tried to block allegations from becoming public, and pushed for a global settlement.

Thousands of lawsuits were consolidated into a multidistrict litigation (MDL) and Judge Dan Aaron Polster of the Northern District of Ohio was tapped to oversee the mammoth litigation and things started heading for trial.

In an apparent first, drug company executives actually went on trial and settlement discussions began.

The Sackler family withdrew over $12 billion from Purdue over 13 years. When the hammer fell, the Sacklers transferred $1.36 billion offshore to Swiss bank accounts.

Then they ran for the exits by declaring bankruptcy, even as billions of dollars languished in offshore banks. The move effectively shielded the Sackler’s personal wealth from the Purdue bankruptcy filing.

The Sackler’s negotiated a sweetheart deal that infuriated virtually everyone because they escaped personal and criminal responsibility.

Recently, however, a judge overturned the settlement because it protected the family.

Legal Funding FAQ

Opioids Lawsuit Settlement FAQ

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How Lawsuit Loans Work

TriMark Legal Funding specializes in helping personal injury accident victims.
Our non-recourse legal funding is a simple 3-step process:

1. Apply for Funding

You can either apply online or call us toll-free at (877) 932-2628. We’ll answer all of your questions and gather some basic facts about your case.

2. Review & Approval

Our team will work directly with your attorney to review your case. Approvals can happen as quickly as 1 hour after receipt of all required information.

3. Receive Cash

A funding agreement is sent via DocuSign. After signed copies are returned, your cash is sent to you by wire transfer or FedEx Overnight.

$0 UPFRONT FEES
NO CREDIT CHECK

Receive $1,000 to $250,000 in 4-24 hours after approval. No upfront or hidden fees and no hassles – EVER. You can relax while we work with your attorney to get you approved quickly.

AMERICA’S ORIGINAL LOWEST RATE GUARANTEE

On settled cases, we can offer capped, non-compounding rates of just over 2%.
We will match or beat any competitor’s contract rate.

100% RISK-FREE
NO WIN = NO PAY

Receive cash now but repay nothing until after your case settles. No monthly payments. Approval is based on the points and estimated net value of your case.


Apply For Lawsuit Funding Now

Lawsuit Funding FAQ Apply Now

Lawsuit cash advances are not currently available on any opioid-related litigation or settlements. TriMark is monitoring the progress of settlement discussions and will update this page if or when it becomes possible to offer funding.


Latest Developments in the Opioid Settlement Litigation…

McKinsey & Company, the consultant to blue-chip corporations and governments around the world, has agreed to pay nearly $600 million to settle investigations into its role in helping “turbocharge” opioid sales, a rare instance of it being held publicly accountable for its work with clients. The firm has reached a $573 million agreement with attorneys general in 47 states, the District of Columbia and five territories, according to a court filing in Massachusetts on Thursday. Separate deals were announced in Washington State, for $13 million, and in West Virginia, for $10 million. Nevada, not party to the agreements, will continue… Read more
Four large pharmacy chains are set to face their first trial over the deadly U.S. opioid epidemic, creating new pressure to reach settlements with state and local governments who accuse them of contributing to the public health crisis. The Ohio counties of Lake and Trumbull allege that oversight failures at pharmacies run by Walgreens Boots Alliance Inc, CVS Health Corp, Walmart Inc and Giant Eagle Inc led to excessive amounts of opioid pills in their communities. Lawyers for the counties and companies are set to deliver opening statements on Monday to a federal jury in Cleveland, where thousands of similar… Read more
Rite Aid Corp affiliates have settled claims by two Ohio counties that it contributed to the opioid addiction epidemic, just over a month before the case was set to go to trial. The pharmacy chain operator and Lake and Trumbull counties disclosed the settlement in a motion filed Wednesday in federal court in Cleveland, Ohio, to sever Rite Aid from the case. They did not reveal terms of the deal, which must be approved by Lake County Commissioners and Trumbull County Commissioners. U.S. District Judge Dan Polster granted the motion on Thursday…. Read more
New details emerge in a lawsuit asserting that chains including CVS, Rite Aid and Walgreens sold millions of pills in small towns but rarely flagged suspicious orders to authorities. Through years of lawsuits and rising public anger over the opioid epidemic, the big American pharmacy retailers have largely eluded scrutiny. But a new court filing Wednesday morning asserts that pharmacies including CVS, Rite Aid, Walgreens and Giant Eagle as well as those operated by Walmart were as complicit in perpetuating the crisis as the manufacturers and distributors of the addictive drugs. The retailers sold millions of pills in tiny communities,… Read more
Make no mistake: The legal fight over liability for the U.S. opioid crisis is only heating up. An 11th-hour settlement Monday morning averted what would have been the first trial in a landmark federal case, one involving thousands of plaintiffs at nearly every level of government and defendants from every link in the chain of opioid drug production. But all the other lawsuits in the broader case remain on track for courtroom confrontations. And with the costs of the crisis estimated at tens of billions of dollars and with more than 200,000 overdose deaths since the late 1990s, the stakes… Read more
Purdue Pharma has filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy protection as part of a plan for settling some of the opioid-related litigation it faces in federal and state courts across the country. These settlements have an estimated value of more than 10 billion dollars. The company has announced the agreement in principle for the settlement framework with 24 state attorney generals, officials from 5 United States territories, the Plaintiffs’ Executive Committee in the multidistrict litigation (MDL), and co-lead counsel in the MDL. The parties included in this agreement in principle represent some of the more than 2600 lawsuits filed against Purdue… Read more
The opioid epidemic is one of those circumstances in which the crisis has required an immediate response by state and local governments to “pick up the pieces” through the provision of social services at a magnitude and cost that were unthinkable prior to 1995. The amount of money spent on first responders and medical treatments and the number of children left parentless because of the epidemic is enormous.  Few individuals question whether state governments should be responding to the social needs of their constituents; however, less has been written about what has been relinquished—that is, the true opportunity costs—because of… Read more
As the fall approaches, anticipation is growing for a breakthrough in the National Prescription Opiate Litigation, the 1,800 combined cases before Judge Dan Polster. The cases accuse Purdue Pharma and other drug manufacturers, along with drug distributors like McKesson, AmerisourceBergen, and Cardinal Health and national pharmacies of responsibility for opioid-related harm. With the first trial in this behemoth case just months away (October 2019), the expectation has been that the opioid litigation will follow the patterns of previous high-profile cases like Big Tobacco or the NFL Concussion cases, reaching a comprehensive settlement before trial. Though Judge Polster has kept the… Read more
Oklahoma is suing Johnson & Johnson in a multibillion-dollar lawsuit to hold the drug giant responsible for its opioid addiction epidemic. Day after day, the memos flashing across screens in an Oklahoma courtroom have jarred with the family-friendly public image of Johnson & Johnson, the pharmaceutical giant best known for baby powder and Band-Aid. In one missive, a sales representative dismissed a doctor’s fears that patients might become addicted to the company’s opioid painkillers by telling him those who didn’t die probably wouldn’t get hooked. Another proposes targeting sales of the powerfully addictive drugs at those most at risk: men… Read more
Every city, town and county in the United States could receive a payout in a settlement with the largest makers, distributors and retailers of prescription opioids, if a judge approves an innovative proposal made Friday in an Ohio federal court by lawyers for hundreds of local governments. The plan, which legal experts describe as “novel” and “unorthodox,” could potentially expand the number of municipalities and counties eligible for compensation in the federal litigation from 1,650 to about 24,500 and open the way for a comprehensive national opioid settlement with the pharmaceutical industry. “We have an epidemic caused by pills that… Read more
Mary Jo White of Debevoise & Plimpton represents four members of the family that controls Purdue Pharma, the company that developed and marketed the painkiller OxyContin. Purdue, along with other opioid makers, wholesalers and distributors, is facing more than 2,000 suits by state, city and county officials who blame prescription opiates for sparking an unprecedented epidemic of drug abuse. In rare public comments on behalf of the Sacklers, White told me why the family believed the litigation against them and their company is legally dubious, factually misleading and politically motivated…. Read more
Thanks to Purdue Pharma and other defendants in the multidistrict litigation that alleges the drug companies sparked the opioid crisis, we now know how much plaintiffs claim they owe to fix it: more than $480 billion. That is the predicted cost, according to Johns Hopkins public health professor Caleb Alexander, of a national abatement plan that would stretch over 10 years. Alexander was cited in summaries of nonpublic reports by plaintiffs’ expert witnesses that Purdue, Endo and Mallinckrodt filed last week as part of an emergency motion for more time to depose the witnesses. The Johns Hopkins prof, according to… Read more
The Sacklers had a new plan. It was 2014, and the company the family had controlled for two generations, Purdue Pharma, had been hit with years of investigations and lawsuits over its marketing of the highly addictive opioid painkiller OxyContin, at one point pleading guilty to a federal felony and paying more than $600 million in criminal and civil penalties. But as the country’s addiction crisis worsened, the Sacklers spied another business opportunity. They could increase their profits by selling treatments for the very problem their company had helped to create: addiction to opioids. Details of the effort, named Project Tango, have come… Read more
Executives from Purdue Pharma, the manufacturer of the powerful opioid painkiller OxyContin, admitted in federal court in 2007 that Purdue’s marketing practices and interactions with doctors had understated the strength and addictive potential of the drug — an omission that many experts believe contributed to an opioid epidemic that claimed nearly 50,000 American lives in 2017 alone. But on Thursday, the release of a previously sealed deposition from 2015 showed that Purdue executives knew of OxyContin’s strength long before that $600 million settlement. The deposition, which had been filed in court, revealed that Dr. Richard Sackler — part of the family that founded and controls Purdue, and… Read more
The world’s most prestigious management-consulting firm, McKinsey & Company, has been drawn into a national reckoning over who bears responsibility for the opioid crisis that has devastated families and communities across America. In legal papers released in unredacted form on Thursday, the Massachusetts attorney general said McKinsey had helped the maker of OxyContin fan the flames of the opioid epidemic. McKinsey’s consultants, the attorney general revealed, had instructed the drug company, Purdue Pharma, on how to “turbocharge” sales of OxyContin, how to counter efforts by drug enforcement agents to reduce opioid use, and were part of a team that looked at how “to counter the… Read more
Drug company executives appearing in court in Boston this week have been accused of running “a criminal enterprise” and putting greed before patient safety as they pushed prescription narcotics during the opioids crisis, blighting the health of America. The defendants are the first painkiller manufacturing bosses to stand trial over conduct authorities say contributed to an overdose epidemic that has killed hundreds of thousands of people in the past 20 years, regardless of region, age, race and income. If the Boston trial and others scheduled to get under way later this year are anything to go by, 2019 is now… Read more
Just over a year ago, opioid lawsuits against makers and distributors of the painkillers were proliferating so rapidly that a judicial panel bundled all the federal cases under the stewardship of a single judge. On a January morning, Judge Dan Aaron Polster of the Northern District of Ohio made his opening remarks to lawyers for nearly 200 municipal governments gathered in his Cleveland courtroom. He wanted the national opioid crisis resolved with a meaningful settlement within a year, proclaiming, “We don’t need briefs and we don’t need trials.” That year is up…. Read more
A Massachusetts judge said Friday she would rule by early next week on a request from media organizations, including STAT and the Boston Globe, to make public redacted portions of a lawsuit brought by the Massachusetts attorney general’s office against Purdue Pharma, the maker of OxyContin and other opioid painkillers. The Connecticut company’s aggressive and misleading marketing of OxyContin has been blamed by addiction experts for helping spawn the opioid addiction crisis. Outside the Boston courthouse Friday, families of people who became addicted to opioids after taking Purdue’s medications rallied, with some calling for criminal charges against the company. “Every… Read more
Following a two-year investigation during which time multiple Indiana cities and counties and at least 27 states filed lawsuits, Indiana Attorney General Curtis Hill announced Nov. 14 his office is leading the state of Indiana into a legal battle over prescription opioids. Hill said his office was filing a complaint in Marion County Court against a single pharmaceutical company, Purdue Pharma, which is already facing hundreds of complaints and has sought financial restructuring advice. “I think the timing is wise,” the attorney general said, explaining why Indiana is choosing to file now. There has been an “exhaustive investigation” for the… Read more
Since a previous contribution to this journal in 2012,2 the epidemic of opioid abuse has become increasingly frightening and tragic. That contribution focused on the relevance of OxyContin to prescription opioid diversion and abuse, the marketing tactics employed by pharmaceutical companies to promote products, and the associated economic medicalization of substance abuse and addiction. This update details dramatic changes in the epidemic and explores attempts being made to combat the rising opioid overdose death toll. Important legal developments arising from the marketing and distribution of prescription opioids are overviewed. Specifically, the proliferation of legal actions against firms involved in the… Read more
Judge Dan Aaron Polster of the Northern District of Ohio has perhaps the most daunting legal challenge in the country: resolving more than 400 federal lawsuits brought by cities, counties and Native American tribes against central figures in the national opioid tragedy, including makers of the prescription painkillers, companies that distribute them, and pharmacy chains that sell them. And he has made it clear that he will not be doing business as usual. During the first hearing in the case, in early January, the judge informed lawyers that he intended to dispense with legal norms like discovery and would not… Read more
With the U.S. in the grips of an opioid crisis that has killed hundreds of thousands of people, the role of pharmaceutical manufacturers that made tens of billions of dollars selling the deadly painkillers is coming into focus as litigation and investigations mount. From as far back as 1911 until the late 1990s, the use of opioids, or narcotics, was limited to very narrow circumstances, such as post-surgical pain and end-of-life care. That’s because the medical establishment and regulators were keenly aware of the addictive quality of the drugs and the dangers they posed if misused. But that all… Read more

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