COVID-Related Wrongful Death Lawsuit Loans

Involved in a COVID-Related Wrongful Death Lawsuit?

TriMark Legal Funding provides settlement funding nationwide on wrongful death claims.

COVID-Related Wrongful Death Lawsuit Funding

TriMark Legal Funding is one of America’s leading personal injury accident loan companies. We provide risk-free pre-settlement funding and post-settlement funding (lawsuit loans) to injured plaintiffs while they wait on their lawsuit settlements.


At TriMark Legal Funding, we offer non-recourse lawsuit funding cash advances to plaintiffs who are involved in either pending or settled legal claims, often in 24 hours or less.

Lawsuit loans are a discreet, sensible way to keep your head above water until your attorney has finished negotiating your lawsuit settlement.

At TriMark Legal Funding, we offer non-recourse lawsuit funding cash advances to plaintiffs who are involved in either pending or settled legal claims, often in 24 hours or less.

Lawsuit loans are a discreet, sensible way to keep your head above water until your attorney has finished negotiating your lawsuit settlement.

Let’s Talk!

Call us at (877) 932-2628 or send us your details & we’ll call you.

    This is a contact request form, not an application. If you would like to apply for funding, please click here.

    Have Questions?
    Call and speak with one of our funding experts today.

    Lawsuit Funding 101: The how's, why's, and what for's of legal funding.

    What Is Lawsuit Funding?

    Lawsuit funding is referred to by many names such as lawsuit loans, pre-settlement loans, and post-settlement loans.

    Despite what many people call it, however, it’s not a loan.

    Legal funding is a non-recourse cash advance of a portion of the anticipated future value of a plaintiff’s lawsuit settlement.

    Lawsuit funding is referred to by many names such as lawsuit loans, pre-settlement loans, and post-settlement loans.

    Despite what many people call it, however, it’s not a loan.

    Legal funding is a non-recourse cash advance of a portion of the anticipated future value of a plaintiff’s lawsuit settlement.

    Have Questions?
    Call and speak with one of our funding experts today.

    How Lawsuit Loans Work

    TriMark Legal Funding specializes in helping personal injury accident victims.
    Our non-recourse legal funding is a simple 3-step process:

    1. Apply for Funding

    You can either apply online or call us toll-free at (877) 932-2628. We’ll answer all of your questions and gather some basic facts about your case.

    2. Review & Approval

    Our team will work directly with your attorney to review your case. Approvals can happen as quickly as 1 hour after receipt of all required information.

    3. Receive Cash

    A funding agreement is sent via DocuSign. After signed copies are returned, your cash is sent to you by wire transfer or FedEx Overnight.

    $0 UPFRONT FEES
    NO CREDIT CHECK

    Receive $1,000 to $250,000 in 4-24 hours after approval. No upfront or hidden fees and no hassles – EVER. You can relax while we work with your attorney to get you approved quickly.

    AMERICA’S ORIGINAL LOWEST RATE GUARANTEE

    On settled cases, we can offer capped, non-compounding rates of just over 2%.
    We will match or beat any competitor’s contract rate.

    100% RISK-FREE
    NO WIN = NO PAY

    Receive cash now but repay nothing until after your case settles. No monthly payments. Approval is based on the points and estimated net value of your case.


    Apply For Lawsuit Funding Now

    Are you ready to move your life in a more positive direction?

    TriMark Legal Funding is excited to help you through this difficult time. We’ve helped thousands of people in similar circumstances, and we appreciate the opportunity to help you too.

    Lawsuit Funding FAQ Apply Now

    It’s free to apply, and it only takes a minute. Best of all, you could receive the money you need as quickly as tomorrow. You can apply online or call (877) 932-2628, and one of our friendly representatives will be happy to take your application right over the phone.

    Lawsuit funding from TriMark is just pure financial help, right when you need it most. And approvals can happen so fast that if you apply today, you could receive cash tomorrow.

    When you choose TriMark Legal Funding, you’re in excellent hands, and we’ve always got your back.


    As COVID-19 cases surge in the United States, businesses say they fear a California court ruling has increased the likelihood that companies will be sued for infections, even by people who are not employees or customers. The Dec. 21 ruling allowed a wrongful death lawsuit to proceed against See's Candies Inc, owned by Berkshire Hathaway (BRKa.N), by the family of Arturo Ek of Los Angeles who died in April 2020 at 72 from COVID-19. See's employed his wife, Matilde Ek, who said she was infected by the coronavirus while working inches apart from sick coworkers, and then her husband caught it from her at home. The ruling is the first by an appeals court to allow a novel "take-home" COVID-19 lawsuit, which seek damages from… Read more
    The first wrongful death claim stemming from COVID-19 in San Bernardino County jails has been filed against the county and the Sheriff’s Department amid a resurgence in coronavirus-related illnesses among inmates. The uptick, sparking outcry from prison rights activists, mirrors a seasonal surge in COVID-19 cases across the Inland Empire and Southern California that is flooding hospital emergency rooms and causing traffic jams at coronavirus testing sites. As of Dec. 28, the Sheriff’s Department reported four new coronavirus cases in the past week at the West Valley Detention Center in Rancho Cucamonga, two at the High Desert Detention Center in Adelanto, and one at the Central Detention Center in San Bernardino. No new cases were reported at the Glen Helen Rehabilitation Center in Devore. One… Read more
    California’s largest nursing home owner, Shlomo Rechnitz, is facing a lawsuit alleging that one of his homes is responsible for the COVID-related deaths of some 24 elderly and dependent residents. Rechnitz is the Los Angeles-based, multi-billionaire owner of Brius Healthcare, the largest nursing home company in California. In 1998, Rechnitz began his business career by selling supplies—such as latex gloves, adult diapers, and wheelchairs—to nursing homes with his twin brother, Steve. Together, they founded and operated TwinMed, LLC, and have grown it into a nation-wide distributor of medical supplies and services. Brius owns two nursing homes in Santa Clara County, Cupertino Healthcare & Wellness Center and San Jose Healthcare & Wellness Center, plus five in Alameda County and one in Contra Costa County. Brius and affiliated companies… Read more
    The nursing homes had argued that the suits against them belonged in federal court, citing an emergency U.S. law known as the Public Readiness and Emergency Preparedness (PREP) Act, which shields those fighting the pandemic from lawsuits. The 3rd U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals in Philadelphia affirmed a lower court ruling and rejected the nursing homes' argument that the PREP Act was so far reaching that families' state-law negligence claims were really federal claims that belonged in federal court. The families "asserted only garden-variety state-law claims, so state court is where these cases belong," the court said. Neil Lapinski, a Gordon, Fournaris & Mammarella attorney who represented the families, said "the court has provided a clear roadmap for litigants" that was consistent with lower court… Read more
    A new legal filing asks a federal judge to grant class-action status to prisoners who were diagnosed with COVID-19 as well as the estates of prisoners who died after contracting the illness. The latest request was submitted Monday in an ongoing lawsuit that alleges the Oregon Department of Corrections failed to protect incarcerated people from the virus that has swept through the prison system. According to the latest figures from the state, 3,607 prisoners have tested positive for COVID-19 and 42 have died. Corrections officials, the U.S. District Court filing claims, have “willfully and wantonly ignored the public health threat caused by this global pandemic and, as a result, class members have been harmed, and lives have been lost.” Lawyers ask the court to designate… Read more
    A Southwest Airlines flight attendant has filed a wrongful death lawsuit against her employer, accusing the company of lax COVID-19 protocols and contact tracing that eventually led to the death of her husband. Carol Madden, 69, filed the suit in the U.S. District Court in Maryland seeking more than $3 million in damages, USA Today reported. Madden attended a one-day training session at Baltimore-Washington International Airport on July 13. Her husband, Bill, drove her home from the event. The couple got sick days later and later tested positive for COVID-19, according to the lawsuit. His condition quickly deteriorated and he died a few weeks later. COVID pneumonia was listed as the first cause of death. Bill Madden, a veteran and retired railroad signal engineer, was… Read more
    A class-action lawsuit filed against Tyson Foods on Tuesday said that twice as many Tyson employees died after contracting COVID-19 than any other meat processing company. Filed in the Eastern District of New York, the lawsuit alleges that Tyson Foods provided shareholders with false claims about their safety protocols to the COVID-19 pandemic. A letter requesting an investigation into Tyson's annual financial report was sent to the Securities and Exchange Commission in December by New York City Comptroller Scott Stringer. After Stringer alleged that Tyson Foods misrepresented its COVID-19 precautions, stock in Tyson Foods dropped 8.5 percent over a span of five trading days. According to Stringer's letter, which is referenced in the lawsuit, Tyson reported the greatest number of COVID-19 cases of "any company… Read more
    The family of Carlos Ernesto Escobar Mejia, who died in immigration custody after contracting the coronavirus during an outbreak at Otay Mesa Detention Center, has sued the federal government as well as the private prison company in charge of the facility. Escobar Mejia was the first person to die in the custody of Immigration and Customs Enforcement because of COVID-19. Eight in total have died from the virus since the pandemic began. The lawsuit, filed in the Southern District of California by Escobar Mejia’s three siblings, alleges negligence, deliberate indifference to serious health and safety needs and wrongful death. The complaint argues that officials held Escobar Mejia in conditions that they “knew would expose him to a deadly disease.” “CoreCivic deprived him of adequate personal… Read more
    News reports show that COVID-19 deaths among nursing home patients and staff from the virus. Due to the high amount of deaths among nursing homes and in other industries, the COVID-19 pandemic has had a significant impact on the U.S. court system, both federal and state. Most of the lawsuits are individual claimants, but a handful of class action cases are making their way through the courts. The following takes a look at three wrongful death class actions that cross several industries. New Jersey Nursing Home Class Action On September 8, 2020, a lead plaintiff in New Jersey filed a wrongful death class action in Sussex County Superior Court related to nursing home violations during COVID-19. The case is The administrator of the Roberts estate… Read more
    U.S. businesses with COVID-19 outbreaks are facing an emerging legal threat from claims that workers brought coronavirus home and infected relatives, which one risk analysis firm said could cost employers billions of dollars. The cases borrow elements from “take home” asbestos litigation and avoid caps on liability for workplace injuries, exposing business to costly pain and suffering damages, even though the plaintiff never set foot on their premises. “Businesses should be very concerned about these cases,” said labor and employment attorney Tom Gies of Crowell & Moring, which defends employers. The lawsuit against Aurora alleges that Ricardo Ugalde worked “shoulder to shoulder” on the company’s processing line in April when Aurora knew it had a coronavirus outbreak at its facility and failed to warn employees… Read more
    This week’s spotlight is on a category of COVID-19 related workplace complaints that undoubtedly has caused many sleepless nights for employers around the country: deaths caused by COVID-19 infections allegedly connected to the workplace.  This week’s update to the tracker includes two such cases – one relates to the alleged wrongful death of an employee from COVID-19, and the other concerns the death of an employee’s spouse.  In each case, the plaintiffs allege a lack of effective institutional response to the virus, as well as a failure to warn employees who may have come in contact with the COVID-19 virus in the workplace. The allegations in these cases demonstrate the importance of employers implementing a plan of action to mitigate the dangers to the workforce. … Read more
    Employers across the country are being sued by the families of workers who contend their loved ones contracted lethal cases of Covid-19 on the job, a new legal front that shows the risks of reopening workplaces. Walmart Inc., Safeway Inc., Tyson Foods Inc. and some health-care facilities have been sued for gross negligence or wrongful death since the coronavirus pandemic began unfolding in March. Employees’ loved ones contend the companies failed to protect workers from the deadly virus and should compensate their family members as a result. Workers who survived the virus also are suing to have medical bills, future earnings and other damages paid out…. Read more
    A woman whose mother died of the coronavirus at a Seattle-area nursing home that was ravaged by the COVID-19 outbreak filed a wrongful death lawsuit on Friday against the company that owns the facility. Debbie de los Angeles, whose mother Twilla Morin, 85, died on March 4 at the Life Care Center in Kirkland, Washington of COVID-19 sued its parent company, Life Care Centers of America, alleging the company concealed vital facts about the outbreak before her mother died. It is believed to be the first wrongful death lawsuit against the company, whose facility in Kirkland was the initial epicenter of the COVID-19 outbreak in the United States, and has been linked to at least 35 coronavirus deaths. Cleveland, Tennessee-based Life Care Centers of America… Read more
    The family of a Chicago-area Walmart employee who died from COVID-19 has filed a lawsuit against the retail giant, alleging that the company failed to take the precautions necessary to protect its employees during the coronavirus outbreak. The law firm that filed the lawsuit on behalf of Wando Evans' estate identified it as the first known wrongful death lawsuit related to COVID-19 in Illinois. When asked for comment on the suit, a spokesman for Walmart said they "take the issue seriously and will respond with the court once we have been served with the complaint," which was filed Monday in Cook County. Evans, 51, had worked for 15 years as an overnight stock and maintenance associate at the Walmart Supercenter in Evergreen Park, located at… Read more
    A relative of a Walmart employee in Illinois who died from COVID-19 complications filed a wrongful death lawsuit against the retail giant, alleging the store did not do enough to protect employees from the novel coronavirus. Wando Evans, who worked at a Walmart store in Evergreen Park for 15 years, was found dead in his home on March 25. He had first mentioned symptoms consistent with the novel coronavirus to management at his store two weeks prior but was largely ignored, according to court documents filed Tuesday in Cook County Circuit Court. Evans, who worked overnights in stock and maintenance at Walmart, was sent home by store management on March 23, and then found dead just two days later. He was 51. The lawsuit alleges Walmart was negligent in,… Read more
    The family of a Walmart Inc employee in Illinois who died after contracting COVID-19, the illness caused by the novel coronavirus, has filed a lawsuit accusing the retail giant of failing to adequately screen and protect workers. Evans died on March 25, and another employee at the same store died four days later from complications due to COVID-19, according to the complaint. Arkansas-based Walmart said it had conducted “a deep-cleaning of key areas” in the Illinois store, which has passed a health department inspection and a separate third-party review over the last week, according to a statement provided by a spokesman. “We have taken steps across the country to protect our associates and customers, including additional cleaning measures, installing sneeze guards at registers, placing social… Read more

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    Still have questions?

    Call (877) 932-2628 and speak with one of our legal funding experts.

    * Word-Use Disclaimer

    Legal funding is not a loan. It is the non-recourse purchase of an equitable lien in plaintiffs’ legal claims. Words such as ‘loans,’ ‘lending,’ ‘borrow,’ etc., are used for marketing purposes only.
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    TriMark Legal Funding LLC
    1056 Green Acres Rd #102
    Eugene, OR 97408