Subtle racial slights at work cause job dissatisfaction, burnout for Black employees

Black employees face a host of subtle verbal, behavioral and environmental slights related to their physical appearance, work ethic, integrity and more, causing job dissatisfaction and burnout, according to a new study from Rice University.

Although research on microaggressions (defined as commonplace verbal, behavioral or environmental slights) has gained popularity in recent years, King said work that specifically focuses on anti-Black microaggressions—especially in the workplace—is still limited.

“This lack of knowledge is a real problem,” King said. “Discrimination encountered in the workplace is more complicated and difficult to manage than in other scenarios. Outside of work, an individual can remove themself from a setting or say something, but at work, the same individual may be afraid to speak up because of fear of retaliation, loss of a job, etc.”

King and Fattoracci documented three common types of workplace microaggressions toward Black employees. The first was expression of anti-Black stereotypes, including negative assumptions

How ageism is embezzling billions from the US economy

It was the proverbial adolescent eye-roll heard around the world:

“Okay, Boomer.”

While this young woman’s comment created one of the most memorable, publicized and memed examples of raw ageism to date, the event sadly made no positive movement in the fight against ageism. In fact, there were more pointless memes and social media name-calling that sprouted from her utterance than fruitful conversations around solving the complexities of intergenerational politics.

Just like most ageist incidents, “Okay, Boomer” was brushed under the rug, largely ignored despite its blatant prejudicial tone and stereotyping intentions.

Why is ageism ignored?

As our aging population grows, ageism is becoming increasingly rampant. For example, according to the most recent survey by AARP, nearly 80% of older employees now report age discrimination

Sexual Harassment Law Finds Its Way Into Oklahoma Indian Country

Since the passage of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 (Title VII), signed into law by President Lyndon Johnson, Title VII has become a fixture in private workplaces across the nation. Amended over the years, Title VII became synonymous with workplace protection against sexual harassment in the wake of Professor Anita Hill’s allegations against then Supreme Court nominee Clarence Thomas in 1994. For the last quarter of a century and counting Title VII continues to be the primary mechanism by which sexual harassment and gender discrimination is identified and dealt with administratively through the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission and its state law counterpart agencies, and through private civil litigation brought in federal courts in all fifty states.

While Title VII remains ubiquitous in discussions about sexual harassment in the private workplace, historically speaking the same cannot be said for employers in Indian Country. That is primarily because tribes were not

Young Workers Face Reverse Ageism In The Workplace

Ageism in the workplace has been known to affect older workers. While the Age Discrimination in Employment Act (ADEA) forbids age discrimination against people who are 40 and older, this is largely symbolic and only effective to instances of overt age discrimination.

58% of workers in their fifties report facing age discrimination of some sort, and of those who experience age discrimination, 95% report that it is a common occurrence at work.

However, ageism being a problem in the workplace is not exclusive to older professionals. Young professionals also experience forms of ageism in the workplace. Some media coverage of this problem has been referring to it as “reverse ageism.”

What is “reverse ageism?”
We typically think of older professionals when the term “ageism” is used. As of late, the term “reverse ageism” has been used to describe a similar set of concerns facing younger workers.

Working From Home And Worker Bargaining Power

A good deal of the narrative and debate over working from home focuses on workers—what do they get, why do they want it, how they are choosing it. But to work from home, someone has to pay you. Does telework signal a change in the power relationship between employers and employees?

Economist Teresa Ghilarducci told us in a recent Forbes blog that there are 10 indicators of workers’ bargaining power, and only 4 of them are up—quit rates, reservation wages, the unemployment rate, and the number of jobs per unemployed worker. But productivity and profits are rising faster than wages, the labor share of the nation’s wealth has fallen, and real income for workers also is down—all trends that favor employers over workers.

We shouldn’t

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