sexual harassment settlement

Harvey Weinstein Accusers Agree to $17 Million Settlement

Some 40 women will participate in the bankruptcy court agreement, though others who have sued Mr. Weinstein and accused him of sexually abusing them have objected to the terms and are considering an appeal.

Nearly four years after the first claims against Harvey Weinstein made their way into the court system, some of the many women who sued him on sexual assault and sexual harassment grounds may be close to getting financial compensation.

On Monday, a bankruptcy court judge in Delaware confirmed the settlement deal, clearing the way for dozens of women who say they were sexually assaulted or harassed by Mr. Weinstein to receive a portion of the $17 million victims fund, largely by ending their civil claims against him.

“Eighty-three percent of the victims have expressed very loudly that they want closure through acceptance of this plan,” the bankruptcy judge, Mary F. Walrath, said in a hearing. Nearly 40 women voted last month to accept the terms of the settlement, which would allow their claims to be evaluated and paid out using a point system, potentially putting an end to a lengthy and anguishing process to determine how the numerous women who accused Mr. Weinstein of sexual misconduct might find restitution.

Mr. Weinstein, 68, was sentenced last March to 23 years in prison after being convicted of rape and another felony sex crime in a criminal trial in New York.

“My clients are so relieved,” said Genie Harrison, a lawyer who represents five women who voted to be part of the settlement. “They wanted an outcome, not another promise of years of additional litigation, with them being the targets — and that’s the way cases like this are.” Some women could stand to receive five-figure payouts from the fund, which was set aside — and then whittled down — as part of a liquidation plan after the Weinstein Company filed for bankruptcy in 2018.

Lawyers for the Weinstein Company did not respond to emails and voice messages.

The settlement agreement offers different payment levels to women based on whether they want to release Harvey Weinstein from any future lawsuits.

Sierra Creative Sexual Harassment and Retaliation Lawsuit Settled

Sierra Creative Systems, Inc., doing business as Addressers, a Paramount, Calif.-based printing, mailing and fulfillment company, has agreed to pay $690,000 to settle a sexual harassment and retaliation lawsuit filed by the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC), the federal agency announced today.

The EEOC’s lawsuit charged Sierra Creative with subjecting female employees to sexual harassment and retaliation at its North Hollywood facility. The alleged harassment included unwelcome touching, sexual comments and derogatory statements about women. The EEOC further asserted that Sierra Creative failed to adequately respond to complaints of discrimination made against one of its supervisors. In addition, the EEOC alleged that those who complained were denied hours and subjected to retaliatory harassment.

Such alleged conduct violates Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964.

Sexual Harassment and Arbitration Clauses In the Office

Gretchen Carlson is both extraordinary—in her cultural visibility, in her multimillion-dollar career, in her personal accomplishments—and utterly ordinary. When she filed a lawsuit in July alleging sexual harassment during her tenure at Fox News, she became part of a disturbing statistic: at least 25% of American women say they have experienced sexual harassment in the workplace, according to a 2016 report from the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission. She also faced an obstacle that blocks an untold lot of them: an arbitration clause in her employment contract.

There is no reliable data on how many Americans have ceded their rights to a court hearing through arbitration clauses; one academic study estimates, using projections based on narrow data sets, that as many as a quarter of nonunionized American workers may be subject

N.J. pays out millions in sexual harassment cases

Soon after joining New Jersey’s corrections officer academy, Gina Marie DiPasquale was taken aback by what she saw as blatant harassment of female trainees.

DiPasquale, an instructor at the Sea Girt academy, complained to her superiors about sexually offensive cadences used in training, verbal obscenities, inappropriate touching of female trainees by male instructors and other issues, according to court documents.

As a result, she was called a “psycho-b—” and “snitch” by co-workers. She was also subject to on-the-job retaliation, sex and gender discrimination, sexual harassment and a hostile work environment, according to court documents.

Fed up, she filed suit against the state in 2005 and resigned. Last year, she agreed to accept $415,000 from the state to settle the case. As part of the settlement,

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