A SMB Guide to Equal Employment Opportunity (EEO) in 2022

EEO compliance is more than the law: it’s good business. This article breaks down equal employment opportunity laws and how to make them work for your small business.
The best reason to cultivate a diverse, inclusive workforce is that it helps your business succeed, as demonstrated by two recent studies by McKinsey & Company. An inclusive work environment broadens your talent pool, enhances the employee experience, improves customer service, and drives innovation.

If you’re like many business owners, you might think equal employment opportunity (EEO) is a given. Why wouldn’t you bring the best and the brightest on board? Yet it takes more than a commitment to the idea of equal opportunity to promote an inclusive workplace.

It takes careful planning, a solid framework, and active engagement. This article will help you translate good intentions into concrete actions to create an inclusive workplace.

Overview: The history and evolution of equal

Know Your Time Limits – Sexual Harassment

Workplace sexual harassment is a form of workplace discrimination that is prohibited by both state and federal law. If you believe you were sexually harassed in the workplace, you need to take action as soon as possible. Filing a claim comes with several steps and time limits that require full compliance.

You should start with your employer and follow their policy for reporting the harassment. But you also have the right to check and discuss the matter with an Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) field office. EEOC agents will be able to give you the best advice about your options.

The EEOC has set deadlines for discrimination charges, including sexual harassment.

What Is the Statute of Limitations on Workplace Sexual Harassment?
You’re probably conflicted about your circumstance. But if it lends to a harassment claim, it’s recommended that you

Sexual Harassment and Arbitration Clauses In the Office

Gretchen Carlson is both extraordinary—in her cultural visibility, in her multimillion-dollar career, in her personal accomplishments—and utterly ordinary. When she filed a lawsuit in July alleging sexual harassment during her tenure at Fox News, she became part of a disturbing statistic: at least 25% of American women say they have experienced sexual harassment in the workplace, according to a 2016 report from the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission. She also faced an obstacle that blocks an untold lot of them: an arbitration clause in her employment contract.

There is no reliable data on how many Americans have ceded their rights to a court hearing through arbitration clauses; one academic study estimates, using projections based on narrow data sets, that as many as a quarter of nonunionized American workers may be subject

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