Cordis and Cook IVC Lawsuit Settlement

IVC filters have been linked to an increased risk of fracture which can cause serious injury or death. Our law firm is focused on Cordis and Cook IVC filter cases.

The IVC filter lawsuits have been going on for a long time, too long. Our lawyers frequently get calls from people who are frustrated that their lawyer has “done nothing” to advance their case towards settlement. We also get calls from victims who cannot find a lawyer. This page gives you information if you have filed an IVC filter lawsuit or are thinking of filing such a claim.

PA Jury Awards $33M IVC Filter Trial

A Philadelphia jury has awarded more than $33 million to a woman who was injured as a result of a defectively designed blood filter.

The jury in the case, captioned Reed-Brown v. Rex Medical, awarded plaintiff Tracy Reed-Brown $1,045,764 million in future medical expenses and $2,322,650 million in future pain and suffering. The jury also found that defendant Rex Medical’s conduct merited a punitive damages award, and, following an abbreviated argument session, awarded an additional $30,315,726 in punitive damages.

Cordis IVC Filter Lawsuit

In early December of 2018, twenty-seven people filed a lawsuit against the Cordis Corporation, the manufacturers of the OptEase® Vena Cava Filter, also known as an IVC filter. The plaintiffs allege that these defective IVC filters have resulted in life-threatening blood clots and other serious injuries.

Because of the nature of the filter, some of the plaintiffs cannot have it removed, as it has become embedded in the walls of the vena cava, and removing it is too dangerous. These patients have not only suffered life-threatening injuries, but the filter causing these injuries – and possible future incidents – must stay in their bodies for the rest of their lives. It is like having a time bomb in the body.

$3.6 Million Award in First Bard IVC Filter Case

A woman who was injured by a device that was implanted to prevent blood clots was awarded $3.6 million by a federal jury in Phoenix.

Sherr-Una Booker said she was harmed by an inferior vena cava (IVC) filter made by C. R. Bard. The filter was implanted June 21, 2007. Jurors on Friday, March 30, 2018, ordered Bard to pay Booker $1.6 million for failure to warn of the dangers of the device. That was 80 percent of the $2 million in total compensation jurors said she was due.  Jurors ruled another third party is responsible for the rest.

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