employment law

A Small Business Owner’s Guide to Federal Employment Laws

You want to treat your employees fairly and provide a healthy work environment for all. But in the real world, things sometimes get messy. You have an employee who needs time off, but he’s the only person who can do his job. Someone is upset about being passed over for a promotion. Another employee is allergic to a coworker’s perfume. And someone is “dishing the company tea” on social media.

Now what?

In human resources (HR) training, every ethical challenge has a tidy answer. In practice, it’s often quite difficult to find solutions that everyone agrees are fair and right.

Federal employment laws are nice, tidy guide rails for your business. While they don’t resolve every HR dilemma, they give you a framework for handling many of the complexities involved in employing people.

This article covers nine types of federal labor laws you need to know and when they apply

How to Become ADA Compliant in 4 Steps

More than 40 million people in the U.S. live with some form of disability. Creating a fair recruitment process and implementing an accessible work environment for all employees should be of the utmost importance.

It’s also a legal requirement.

The Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) prohibits discrimination against individuals with disabilities in all areas of public life. The ADA went into effect in 1990. It’s a federal law, so it applies to every state without variation.

HR managers need to be well versed in ADA compliance if they want to avoid lawsuits.

Overview: What is ADA compliance?
The ADA guarantees equal opportunity for individuals with disabilities in a number of different settings. The Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) enforces sections of the ADA that prohibit employment discrimination.

Any organization operating in certain settings must make the required accommodations to be sure they’re complying with ADA guidelines.

These settings include:

Public

Weight-Loss Surgery Covered by Workers’ Comp, Carolina Appeals Court Finds

Workers’ compensation insurer Erie Insurance Group must pay for weight-loss surgery for an obese woman who was injured at her child-care center, the North Carolina Court of Appeals decided this week.

The appeals court upheld the North Carolina Industrial Commission’s 2021 award of benefits to Robin Kluttz-Ellison, owner of Noah’s Playloft, a preschool in Salisbury. After the woman fell twice and injured her knees, doctors testified that she needed knee surgery. But before she could have the surgery, Kluttz-Ellison needed to lose a considerable amount of weight, her doctors said.

After multiple, unsuccessful attempts to lose weight, the woman and her physicians said that gastric bypass surgery was her only option, and the full Industrial Commission agreed. Erie Insurance appealed, arguing that the obesity was a pre-existing condition and that bariatric surgery was not directly related to the claimant’s compensable injury.

The Court of Appeals ruled against the insurer.

“By connecting the dots,

Sexual Harassment Law Finds Its Way Into Oklahoma Indian Country

Since the passage of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 (Title VII), signed into law by President Lyndon Johnson, Title VII has become a fixture in private workplaces across the nation. Amended over the years, Title VII became synonymous with workplace protection against sexual harassment in the wake of Professor Anita Hill’s allegations against then Supreme Court nominee Clarence Thomas in 1994. For the last quarter of a century and counting Title VII continues to be the primary mechanism by which sexual harassment and gender discrimination is identified and dealt with administratively through the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission and its state law counterpart agencies, and through private civil litigation brought in federal courts in all fifty states.

While Title VII remains ubiquitous in discussions about sexual harassment in the private workplace, historically speaking the same cannot be said for employers in Indian Country. That is primarily because tribes were not

This Expert Helps HIV-Positive Folks Fight Workplace Discrimination

Brian McComak spends his days helping businesses look more like America — a true mix of races, genders, and identities — as founder and CEO of the consulting firm Hummingbird Humanity. McComak, whose book, Humanity in the Workplace: A Blueprint for Building an Inclusive & Equitable Company Culture, is set for release this year, says diversity also includes those living with HIV, as he is. We connected with McComak on the uncomfortable process of coming out about your status at work and what to do when the reception is less than positive.

When you came out to friends and coworkers about your HIV status, you described the situation as stressful. What are some tips to make it smoother? I still remember the anxiety I felt about

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