Subtle racial slights at work cause job dissatisfaction, burnout for Black employees

Black employees face a host of subtle verbal, behavioral and environmental slights related to their physical appearance, work ethic, integrity and more, causing job dissatisfaction and burnout, according to a new study from Rice University.

Although research on microaggressions (defined as commonplace verbal, behavioral or environmental slights) has gained popularity in recent years, King said work that specifically focuses on anti-Black microaggressions—especially in the workplace—is still limited.

“This lack of knowledge is a real problem,” King said. “Discrimination encountered in the workplace is more complicated and difficult to manage than in other scenarios. Outside of work, an individual can remove themself from a setting or say something, but at work, the same individual may be afraid to speak up because of fear of retaliation, loss of a job, etc.”

King and Fattoracci documented three common types of workplace microaggressions toward Black employees. The first was expression of anti-Black stereotypes, including negative assumptions

How ageism is embezzling billions from the US economy

It was the proverbial adolescent eye-roll heard around the world:

“Okay, Boomer.”

While this young woman’s comment created one of the most memorable, publicized and memed examples of raw ageism to date, the event sadly made no positive movement in the fight against ageism. In fact, there were more pointless memes and social media name-calling that sprouted from her utterance than fruitful conversations around solving the complexities of intergenerational politics.

Just like most ageist incidents, “Okay, Boomer” was brushed under the rug, largely ignored despite its blatant prejudicial tone and stereotyping intentions.

Why is ageism ignored?

As our aging population grows, ageism is becoming increasingly rampant. For example, according to the most recent survey by AARP, nearly 80% of older employees now report age discrimination

Making your workplace inclusive for trans employees doesn’t have to be complicated

Nearly half (49%) of transgender employees in the US have reported discrimination—“being fired or not hired”—based on their gender identity, compared to 28% of cisgender LGB employees, according to a 2021 UCLA study. And despite a 2020 Supreme Court decision asserting that gay, lesbian, and transgender employees are protected from discrimination based on sex, transgender people in the US continue to face a high risk of unemployment or poverty, according to recent polling from the Center for American Progress.
So what can an HR leader intent on creating an inclusive workplace do about it? The National Center for Transgender Equality is a nonprofit organization that advocates for the understanding and acceptance of transgender people throughout the US. HR Brew recently spoke with Olivia Hunt, the

EEOC to Add Non-Binary Gender Option to Discrimination Charge Intake Process

The U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) announced today that it will promote greater equity and inclusion for members of the LGBTQI+ community by giving individuals the option to select a nonbinary “X” gender marker during the voluntary self-identification questions that are part of the intake process for filing a charge of discrimination.

This announcement comes on Transgender Day of Visibility, which recognizes the resilience and accomplishments of the transgender community.

“The addition of a nonbinary gender marker to the EEOC’s charge intake process will be an important step to promote greater inclusion for members of the LGBTQI+ community,” said EEOC Chair Charlotte A. Burrows. “To advance our mission to prevent and remedy employment discrimin­ation, we must serve all workers, including those who do not identify as male or female. Our public-facing forms should make clear that we respect that diversity.”

Recognizing that the binary construction of gender as either

Workplace Discrimination After a Miscarriage

Recovering from a miscarriage can take a few weeks to a month or more.
Workplace discrimination can push women back to work too soon or cause job loss.
Experts say legal remedies fall short and place undue burden on employees who feel they’ve been discriminated against.

About 10 to 15 percent of known pregnancies end in miscarriage.

During a miscarriage, physical symptoms can range from mild to severe.

Recovery time varies from person to person, depending on factors such as weeks of pregnancy, underlying conditions, and whether there are complications.

The healing process can take anywhere from a few weeks to a month or more.

Recovery can be a lot more difficult if you can’t take time off work for fear of losing your job.

Rachel Makkar was

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