Zantac

Health Concern: What You Need to Know About the 2020 Zantac Recall

What is Zantac?
Zantac is a popular OTC (over-the-counter) drug that is taken to relieve and prevent heartburn. It is also used to treat indigestion, acid reflux, and a variety of other health issues associated with GERD (gastroesophageal reflux disease), and it can be prescribed by a physician to treat any of these disorders.

In early 2020, the FDA issued a recall on Zantac due to the fact that its active ingredient ranitidine may be linked to the development of certain cancers, including stomach, colon, and bladder cancers.

Ranitidine Explained
Prior to April 2020, the main ingredient in Zantac (and some other antacids) was ranitidine, which is an H2 blocker (histamine-2 antagonist). The purpose of H2 blockers in antacids is to prevent certain cells in

Cancer worries halt shipments of generic Zantac

A division of Swiss pharmaceutical maker Novartis is halting distribution of generic Zantac pills over concerns about an ingredient possibly linked to cancer.

Novartis-owned Sandoz has issued a “precautionary distribution stop” of all medicines containing ranitidine, an antacid and antihistamine used to block stomach acid.

The stop “in all our markets will remain in place” until “further clarification,” Novartis said.

“Our internal investigation is ongoing to determine further details,” the company said.

The move came after the Food and Drug Administration last week said it had detected low levels of a probable carcinogen in the heartburn drug Zantac and its generic versions.

Test findings:FDA finds probable carcinogen in Zantac and other heartburn drugs

The probable carcinogen, called NDMA, has also prompted the recall of several

Heartburn drug Zantac may contain small amounts of carcinogen

A substance that could cause cancer has been found in some ranitidine heartburn and ulcer medicines, including the brand-name drug Zantac, and the source of this contamination is being investigated, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration says.

While preliminary tests found low levels of the nitrosamine impurity N-nitrosodimethylamine (NDMA) in some ranitidine products, the FDA said this does not mean patients taking the drugs should stop using them now.

NDMA is the same contaminant found in many brands of blood pressure and heart failure medicines during the past year, leading to recalls.

Patients who are taking prescription ranitidine and want to stop using it should discuss alternatives with their health care provider, the FDA advised. Those taking over-the-counter (OTC) ranitidine could switch to other OTC

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