Know Your Time Limits – Sexual Harassment

Workplace sexual harassment is a form of workplace discrimination that is prohibited by both state and federal law. If you believe you were sexually harassed in the workplace, you need to take action as soon as possible. Filing a claim comes with several steps and time limits that require full compliance.

You should start with your employer and follow their policy for reporting the harassment. But you also have the right to check and discuss the matter with an Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) field office. EEOC agents will be able to give you the best advice about your options.

The EEOC has set deadlines for discrimination charges, including sexual harassment.

What Is the Statute of Limitations on Workplace Sexual Harassment?
You’re probably conflicted about your circumstance. But if it lends to a harassment claim, it’s recommended that you

All Entertainment, Media Men Accused of Sexual Misconduct Post Weinstein

The Harvey Weinstein scandal, which was exposed by early October reports published in The New York Times and The New Yorker, opened the floodgates for women, and men, to come forward and share their stories of sexual misconduct, harassment and assault.

Despite their claims being leveled against some of the most powerful figures in Hollywood and media — from celebrated stars to high-ranking agents and executives — the alleged victims have collectively claimed to be empowered by the changing tide, spirit of the #MeToo movement and of once-dismissed voices now being heard. 

The Hollywood Reporter takes a look at the most notable of the accused figures who have been hit with misconduct allegations in the wake of the Weinstein allegations, and what the response has been to the claims. This is

Sexual Harassment and Arbitration Clauses In the Office

Gretchen Carlson is both extraordinary—in her cultural visibility, in her multimillion-dollar career, in her personal accomplishments—and utterly ordinary. When she filed a lawsuit in July alleging sexual harassment during her tenure at Fox News, she became part of a disturbing statistic: at least 25% of American women say they have experienced sexual harassment in the workplace, according to a 2016 report from the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission. She also faced an obstacle that blocks an untold lot of them: an arbitration clause in her employment contract.

There is no reliable data on how many Americans have ceded their rights to a court hearing through arbitration clauses; one academic study estimates, using projections based on narrow data sets, that as many as a quarter of nonunionized American workers may be subject

What Sexual Harassment at Work Really Looks Like

For Gesche Haas, 30, a tech entrepreneur in New York, it was an out-of-the-blue, late-night e-mail from a male coworker: “Take off your underwear, put it in a bag, and leave it on my desk.”

For Tiffany Kirk, 25, a bartender in Houston, it was a comment from a male customer: “I know where to get some really good coke if you want to do a line off my dick.”

And for Joanna Garcia, 28, a bank teller at a Wells Fargo branch in Reno, Nevada, it was a female supervisor allegedly talking nonstop about breasts and penises and graphically describing sexual encounters. “It didn’t feel like a bank,” says Garcia. “It felt almost like a nightclub.”

Young workers least likely to find help, yet suffer deepest scars: Teen sexual harassment

The Equal Employment Opportunity Commission identifies industries that tend to attract employees age 15 to 21. Those industries may feature more casual work environments that can lead to higher incidents of sexual harassment, according to the EEOC. The agency lists fast food, retail, entertainment, hotels and businesses with a seasonal or high-turnover workforce.

An 18-year-old woman alleges her 42-year-old male boss cornered her in a booth at a Tigard tanning salon, stripped off her clothes and took pictures. She asked him to stop, finally pushing him away as he reached for her genitals. Desperate for a paycheck to cover her rent, the teen later asked police, “What was I supposed to do?”

A 17-year-old hostess at an Ashland restaurant alleges a male co-worker constantly asked

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