Month: September 2021

‘They Knew And They Let It Happen To Kids

On his first day on the job in July 2001, Globe editor Martin Baron stopped by the desk of Eileen McNamara, a Pulitzer Prize-winning columnist. A week earlier, on July 29, 2001, McNamara had published a column about the Boston Archdiocese’s silence on three Catholic priests accused of sexually abusing children. One line, in particular, had irked Baron. McNamara had wondered whether an accused priest’s superiors had known about his crimes. Court documents were sealed. “The public,” she concluded, “has no way of knowing.”

McNamara recalls Baron standing over her desk: “Why don’t we find out,” he said.

Spotlight’s investigation of sexual abuse in the Catholic Church did not begin with a tip or newly obtained document, as so many investigations do. Instead, it started when a new

Riverside County pays $900,000 to settle child sex abuse lawsuit against sheriff’s investigator

Riverside County paid $900,000 to settle a lawsuit against the county and former sheriff Stan Sniff brought by three men and a woman who allege they were molested as children by a sheriff’s investigator who took his own life 12 years ago.

The lawsuit accused Sniff, who left office in early 2019 after losing a re-election bid to current Sheriff Chad Bianco, of a “calculated and conscientious” cover-up of Kevin Duffy’s “depraved behavior.” Duffy was never charged with a crime, but Sniff allowed Duffy to go free though investigators wanted to arrest him, the lawsuit filed in federal court alleged.

Reached via email, Sniff declined to comment. County spokesperson Brooke Federico said in an email that the settlement was finalized in July. She declined further comment.

Officism; a New Type of Workplace Discrimination

With the coronavirus Delta variant summer surge delaying many return-to-office plans, a new source of conflict could erupt between workers who have returned to the office and those continuing to work remotely. The conflict could disrupt any chance of a smooth transition to a hybrid workplace.

Perceptyx, a leading employee listening company, found evidence through its work with Fortune 500 customers and a panel research survey of more than 1,000 working Americans, that officism – defined as negative attitudes toward employees who continue to work remotely instead of returning to the office – is clearly present in today’s workforce. The news for remote workers gets worse. Managers, who are directors or above, exhibit the highest levels of officism compared to individual contributors. Those managers are the same people who are designing hybrid work plans while the Delta variant of COVID-19 still surges around the world.

Family of opioid user who died cannot sue workers comp insurer

A federal court in Kansas on Tuesday ruled the parents of a worker who died of conditions related to his opioid use in connection with a workplace injury, chronic pain and subsequent depression can’t sue a workers compensation insurer or the third-party administrator over allegations that they were negligent in delaying approval for medical care.

The man in 2017 suffered multiple disc herniations in his neck, which led to radiating pain in his limbs in his work for pet food company Big Heart Pet Brands Inc., which provided nonsurgical “conservative treatment” for his injury under its workers comp insurance plan, according to documents in Civil Action No. 21-2047-KHV, filed in the United States District Court, District of Kansas, in Kansas City.

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