Xarelto Judge Taps Attorneys to Allocate $93M in Fees to Leading Firms

The federal judge handling the $775 million settlement over the blood thinner Xarelto has established a committee of five attorneys to assess how up to $93 million set aside for leading plaintiffs firms should be doled out.

U.S. District Judge Eldon Fallon of the Eastern District of Louisiana tapped Pensacola, Florida, attorney Brian Barr of Levin Papantonio Thomas Mitchell Rafferty & Proctor; Andy Birchfield of Beasley Allen in Montgomery, Alabama; Leonard Davis of Herman Herman & Katz in New Orleans; Gerald Meunier of Gainsburgh, Benjamin, David, Meunier & Warshauer, also in New Orleans; and Levin Sedran & Berman attorney Michael Weinkowitz in Philadelphia to form what the judge referred to as a “fee allocation liaison counsel” in the Xarelto litigation. The attorneys will be tasked with coming up with a recommendation for how the court should divide up the common benefit fund.

Seattle-area nursing home hit with COVID-19 wrongful death lawsuit

A woman whose mother died of the coronavirus at a Seattle-area nursing home that was ravaged by the COVID-19 outbreak filed a wrongful death lawsuit on Friday against the company that owns the facility.

Debbie de los Angeles, whose mother Twilla Morin, 85, died on March 4 at the Life Care Center in Kirkland, Washington of COVID-19 sued its parent company, Life Care Centers of America, alleging the company concealed vital facts about the outbreak before her mother died.

It is believed to be the first wrongful death lawsuit against the company, whose facility in Kirkland was the initial epicenter of the COVID-19 outbreak in the United States, and has been linked to at least 35 coronavirus deaths.

Cleveland, Tennessee-based Life Care Centers of America Inc is among the largest players in U.S. nursing home care, with more than 200 senior-living centers in 28 states. The company said last month that it would take stringent infection-control measures at all its facilities to guard against coronavirus.

De los Angeles accuses Life Care, its parent company, and senior executives at the Kirkland facility of “failing to disclose material facts” to relatives and residents at the home, so that her mother would be lulled into staying at the facility “in an environment, and under the care of individuals and entities, dangerous to her health and safety.”

Morin died 24 hours after contracting COVID-19 on March 3. De los Angeles never got to see or talk to her mother during that time and discovered her mother’s condition and death through voicemails left by nurses at the care home.

Family of Walmart Employee Files COVID-19 Wrongful Death Lawsuit

The family of a Chicago-area Walmart employee who died from COVID-19 has filed a lawsuit against the retail giant, alleging that the company failed to take the precautions necessary to protect its employees during the coronavirus outbreak.

The law firm that filed the lawsuit on behalf of Wando Evans’ estate identified it as the first known wrongful death lawsuit related to COVID-19 in Illinois.

When asked for comment on the suit, a spokesman for Walmart said they “take the issue seriously and will respond with the court once we have been served with the complaint,” which was filed Monday in Cook County.

Evans, 51, had worked for 15 years as an overnight stock and maintenance associate at the Walmart Supercenter in Evergreen Park, located at 2500 W. 95th St., according to a statement from Injury Lawyers of Illinois, LLC.

The firm alleged that store management ignored Evans when he first mentioned his symptoms consistent with coronavirus before he was ultimately sent home from work on March 23. Two days later, his family said he was found dead at his home.

“I’m devastated because I know I won’t get a chance to say goodbye to him,” longtime friend Daryl Bell said in an interview last week. Bell said Evans was a religious man with “a heart of gold” who was engaged to be married.

A second employee who had worked at the same store for nine years, 48-year-old Phillip Thomas, died on March 29.

Walmart hit with wrongful death lawsuit after employee dies of COVID-19 complications

A relative of a Walmart employee in Illinois who died from COVID-19 complications filed a wrongful death lawsuit against the retail giant, alleging the store did not do enough to protect employees from the novel coronavirus.

Wando Evans, who worked at a Walmart store in Evergreen Park for 15 years, was found dead in his home on March 25. He had first mentioned symptoms consistent with the novel coronavirus to management at his store two weeks prior but was largely ignored, according to court documents filed Tuesday in Cook County Circuit Court.

Evans, who worked overnights in stock and maintenance at Walmart, was sent home by store management on March 23, and then found dead just two days later. He was 51.

The lawsuit alleges Walmart was negligent in, among other things, failing to implement, promote and enforce social distancing guidelines and that it failed to cleanse and sanitize the store in order to prevent the spread of COVID-19.

The suit also alleges the store failed to provide personal protective equipment such as masks, latex gloves and even antibacterial soaps or wipes to employees. Another employee at the same store passed away on March 29 also due to complications related to COVID-19, according to the complaint.

Estate of Walmart worker who died from COVID-19 sues for wrongful death

The family of a Walmart Inc employee in Illinois who died after contracting COVID-19, the illness caused by the novel coronavirus, has filed a lawsuit accusing the retail giant of failing to adequately screen and protect workers.

Evans died on March 25, and another employee at the same store died four days later from complications due to COVID-19, according to the complaint.

Arkansas-based Walmart said it had conducted “a deep-cleaning of key areas” in the Illinois store, which has passed a health department inspection and a separate third-party review over the last week, according to a statement provided by a spokesman.

“We have taken steps across the country to protect our associates and customers, including additional cleaning measures, installing sneeze guards at registers, placing social distancing decals on the floors and limiting the number of customers in a store at a given time,” the company said.

The lawsuit filed by Evans’ estate accuses Walmart of negligence and wrongful death in violation of Illinois law.

According to the complaint, Walmart did not follow guidelines issued by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the U.S. Department of Labor for maintaining safe workplaces, such as implementing social distancing.

Walmart also hired new workers in an expedited process without properly screening them for symptoms of COVID-19, Evans’ estate says.

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