$3.6 Million Award in First Bard IVC Filter Case

A woman who was injured by a device that was implanted to prevent blood clots was awarded $3.6 million by a federal jury in Phoenix.

Sherr-Una Booker said she was harmed by an inferior vena cava (IVC) filter made by C. R. Bard. The filter was implanted June 21, 2007. Jurors on Friday, March 30, 2018, ordered Bard to pay Booker $1.6 million for failure to warn of the dangers of the device. That was 80 percent of the $2 million in total compensation jurors said she was due.  Jurors ruled another third party is responsible for the rest.

Bard wins 3DMax hernia mesh appeal

The New Jersey Superior Court’s Appellate Division this week tossed a win to C.R. Bard, refusing to reinstate a hernia mesh product liability lawsuit on grounds that expert witnesses couldn’t prove the design of the product was defective or that significant negligence occurred.

In the case, plaintiff Kemuel Goodson claims that implantation of Bard’s 3DMax polypropylene mesh during a laparoscopic bilateral inguinal hernia repair in 2006 caused a number of different complications, including remaining pain and the removal of a testicle, and required a number of future procedures.

In his original suit, the plaintiff asserted claims of defective design, negligence and fraud and misrepresentation.

Bard moved for a summary judgment, which was granted, and the plaintiff appealed, claiming the court “erred in granting summary judgment to the defendant on the plaintiff’s claims of design defect and negligence,” according to court documents.

After review, expert testimony from the plaintiffs’ three expert

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